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Some Statistics

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Statistics help give us an overall picture of what is really happening rather than what we think is happening which can be subjective to what we hear, see and know. Simply click on the title of each study for a link to the original source of information.

THE 1 IN 6 STATISTIC

Researchers have found that 1 in 6 men have experienced abusive sexual experiences before age 18. And this is probably a low estimate, since it doesn’t include non contact experiences, which can also have lasting negative effects.

 

What the research tells us:*

  • A 2005 study conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, on San Diego Kaiser Permanente HMO members, reported that 16% of males were sexually abused by the age of 18.
  • A 2003 national study of U.S. adults reported that 14.2% of men were sexually abused before the age of 18.
  • A 1998 study reviewing research on male childhood sexual abuse concluded that the problems is “common, under-reported, under-recognized, and under-treated.”
  • A 1996 study of male university students in the Boston area reported that 18% of men were sexually abused before the age of 16.
  • A 1990 national study of U.S. adults reported that 16% of men were sexually abused before the age of 18.

Why these statistics are probably underestimates:

  • Males who have such experiences are less likely to disclose them than are females.
  • Only 16% of men with documented histories of sexual abuse (by social service agencies, which means it was very serious) considered themselves to have been sexually abused, compared to 64% of women with documented histories in the same study.

Men who’ve had such experiences are at much greater risk than those who haven’t for serious mental health problems, including:

  • Symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.
  • Alcoholism and drug abuse.
  • Suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts.
  • Problems in intimate relationships.
  • Underachievement at school and at work.

STATISTICS FROM RAINN (RAPE, ABUSE AND INCEST NATIONAL NETWORK)

  • 2.78 million men in the U.S. have been victims of sexual assault or rape.

Children

15% of sexual assault and rape victims are under age 12.

  • 29% are age 12-17.
  • 44% are under age 18.
  • 80% are under age 30.
  • 12-34 are the highest risk years.
  • 3% of boys grades 5-8 and 5% of boys in grades 9-12 said they had been sexually abused.

Effects of Rape

Victims of sexual assault are:

3 times more likely to suffer from depression.

6 times more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder.

13 times more likely to abuse alcohol.

26 times more likely to abuse drugs.

4 times more likely to contemplate suicide.

Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse

By: Don Wright, M.Ed, RCC (PDF)

A study funded by the B.C. Ministry of Health, Community and Family Health Services, and Health and Welfare Canada, published July 1, 1991, examined the profiles of 30 pedophiles. The study offered an interesting statistic on the percentage of gender preferences exhibited. Of the 30 pedophiles, 20% had an equal number of boy and girl victims, 30% had more girl than boy victims, and a surprising 50% had more boy than girl victims (“A Study by Child and Youth Mental Health Services, B.C. Ministry of Health: Dimensions of Multiple Victim Child Sexual Abuse in B.C., 1985-1989 and Community Mental Health Interventions”). The percentages quoted in this study run contrary to the current belief that male sexual victimization is rare.

MALE SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ABUSE AND ASSAULT: THEIR EXPERIENCES

By: Susan McDonald and Adamira Tijerino

Research and Statistics Division (Department of Justice Canada ) (PDF)

Publication Year: 2013

  • Male victims accounted for 12% of sexual assaults reported.
  • Male sexual assault is more violent with more corollary injuries and weapons tend to be involved when the perpetrator is a stranger.
  • Most common mental health effects include feeling the stigma, shame, embarrassment
  • Depression, hostility, sleep difficulties, misuse of alcohol and drugs, as well as suicide attempts are all common mental health effects.

 

TABLE 1: PERCENTAGE OF PARTICIPANTS REPORTING TO POLICES

Yes

(%)

No

(%)

In the process of

considering the

option to report

(%)

Child sexual abuse (n=57)

16 (28%)

39 (68%)

2 (4%)

Adult sexual assault (n=10)

2 (20%)

7 (70%)

1 (10%)

 

TABLE 2: REASONS FOR REPORTING

Reasons

Child Sexual

Abuse

Incidents

Adult Sexual

Assault

Incidents

Number of

Incidents

(N=16) 3 (%)

Number of

Incidents (N=2)

(%)

Need to take action

9 (56%)

2 (100%)

Counsellor/therapist/psychologist recommended

8 (53%)

0 (0%)

Family/friend recommended

4 (27%)

1 (50%)

Need to release repressed feelings

4 (27%)

0 (0%)

TABLE 3: REASONS FOR NOT REPORTING CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE AND ADULT SEXUAL ASSAULT TO POLICE

Reasons

Child Sexual

Abuse

Incidents

Adult Sexual

Assault

Incidents

Number of

Incidents

(N=39) 4 (%)

Number of

Incidents (N=7)

(%)

Nobody would believe me

14 (36%)

5 (71%)

Shame/ embarrassment

14 (36%)

2 (29%)

Did not know could report/ Normal at the time

14 (36%)

0 (0%)

No family support

11 (28%)

0 (0%)

Fear offender

8 (21%)

1 (14%)

No evidence

7 (18%)

3 (43%)

No confidence in Criminal Justice System

5 (13%)

4 (57%)

Other

2 (5%) 5

1 (14%) 6

Previous bad experience

1 (3%)

1 (14%)

For sake of family

1 (3%)

0 (0%)

Measuring effects of therapeutic support for male survivors of sexual abuse: A cross sectional study on clients’ sense of well being, self worth, support and employment situation.

By: Amy Yew (MA Psych, RCC ) & Daniel Kline (MA Psych, MCP, RCC )

November 13th, 2013

BC Society of Male Survivors of Sexual Abuse

Therapists and support workers working within the area of trauma are often confronted with multiple issues a client may present. Each area that affects a client impacts them in different ways but are also inter-related to their overall recovery. For this reason, it is important that therapist are aware of changes in each area through time to better meet the needs of their clients. Our therapists and support workers had two central question in mind when we created this study: How are our clients doing on a inter and intra personal level since they started? Do they perceive a change?

Descriptive Statistics

μ

Range scale=min(1)-max(5)

percentage

Length of stay (months)

79.5

2 – 204

33% < 12months

67% > 12 months

Overall sense of well being

4.5

4 – 5

50% slightly improved

50% significantly improved

Employment situation

2.3

1 – 4

50% stayed the same

16.7% became worse

16.7% slightly improved

16.6% did not answer

Level of overall support

3.6

3 – 5

50% significantly increased

17% slightly increased

33% stayed the same

Sense of self worth

4.2

3 – 5

50% slightly increased

33% significantly increased

17% stayed the same

 

Note: N=6. Answers for each question (except length of stay with agency) was on a 5 point scale and a scored rating was assigned to each point. Scoring was not presented on the questionnaire.